• Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking
  • Whistler Hiking

Best of Whistler and Garibaldi Provincial Park Hiking

Best Challenging Trails                                               Top 5 Best Whistler Hiking

Black Tusk - Garibaldi Provincial ParkBlack Tusk is the extraordinarily iconic and appropriately named mountain that can be seen from almost everywhere in Whistler.  The massive black spire of crumbling rock juts out of the earth in an incredibly distinct way that appears like an enormous black tusk plunging out of the ground.  Whether you spot it in the distance from the top of Whistler Mountain or from dozens of vantage points along the Sea to Sky Highway, its unmistakable appearance is breathtaking.  Whether you see it from the highway or from closer vantage points such as Taylor Meadows, Helm Creek, Panorama Ridge or Garibaldi Lake, all views make climbing to the top look impossible.  In fact, Black Tusk seems to look more impossible to climb the Wedgemount Lake - Whistler Hiking Trailscloser you get to it. Wedgemount Lake is one of the most spectacular hikes in Garibaldi Park. Though it is a relentlessly exhausting, steep hike, it is mercifully short at only 7 kilometres (one way).  The elevation gain in that short distance is over 1200 metres which makes it a much steeper hike than most other Whistler hiking trails.  Compared with other Whistler hikes, Wedgemount Lake is half the roundtrip distance of either Black Tusk or Panorama Ridge, for example,  at 13.5k and 15k respectively (one way).  Wedgemount Lake itself is a magnificent destination for a day hike or spectacular overnight beneath the dazzling mountain peaks and stars.  Many sleep under the stars on one of the many beautiful tent platforms that dot the landscape.  RussetRusset Lake and Singing Pass Trail in Whistler Lake is a wonderfully spectacular and varied destination.  For a start it can be accessed by trail or by gondola.  By the Whistler gondola, it’s an unbelievable, yet arduous trek along the High Note Trail.  The 22 minute gondola ride with its wonderful views of Whistler Village in the summertime, then from the top of the gondola, a wonderful walk to the Peak chair where the best is yet to come.  Any time  of year the Peak Chair is like a carnival ride, exhilarating, and wonderful, but in the summer, it’s surreal as well.  Great walls of snow pass under you far below, as you glide upward at times at a shocking degree.  The incline of the ride is extreme, so steep as the breathtaking scenery cannot even distract fully from the nervousness you will surely feel as you glance down, 20 metres to the boulder field below.  Then you arrive, the peak Cirque Lake hiking trail near Whistler BCof Whistler, what a magnificent way to start a hike.  You are still four hours from Russet Lake, but the adventure is well underway. Cirque Lake is an unbelievably beautiful paradise high up above Callaghan Lake in the Callaghan Valley.  It requires a canoe to get you to the trailhead at the far end of Callaghan Lake and therefore is seldom hiked.  The trailhead is tricky to find and the 2 kilometre trail is very steep, though surprisingly well marked with flagging tape.  Once at the lake you find yourself in the wind shadow of the cirque and in a world of serenity and calm.  It is an extraordinary thing to havePanorama Ridge - Whistler Hiking Trails a cirque valley to yourself.  Feels like you are standing in a volcano of sorts.  But a giant, tree filled meadow of a volcano with a mesmerisingly still and perfectly reflecting lake at its centre.  A cirque lake is a wonderful thing, and Cirque Lake in Whistler takes you as close to a hiking paradise as a place can get.  Panorama Ridge is certainly one of the most amazing hikes in Garibaldi Park.  Usually accessed by the Rubble Creek (Garibaldi Lake) trailhead, just off the Sea to Sky Highway 30 minutes south of Whistler.  The hike to Panorama Ridge is comparatively long at 15k trailhead to ridge, but there is plenty to marvel at along the way.  Though the first 5k is fairly uneventful as you gain altitude via several deeply forested switchbacks.  After the switchbacks you come to a fork in the trail.  You can take either fork to reach Panorama Ridge.

More of the Best Challenging Hiking Trails in Whistler and Garibaldi Park >>

Best Aerial Hiking Videos                                           Top 5 Best Whistler Hiking

Aerial View of Wedgemount LakeWedgemount Lake in Garibaldi Provincial Park is a relentlessly exhausting, steep hike, yet it is mercifully short at only 7 kilometres (one way).  The elevation gain in that short distance is over 1200 metres which makes it a much steeper hike than most other Whistler hiking trails.  Compared with other Whistler hikes, Wedgemount Lake is half the roundtrip distance of either Black Tusk or Panorama Ridge, for example,  at 13.5k and 15k respectively (one way).  Wedgemount Lake itself is a magnificent destination for a day hike or spectacular overnight beneath the dazzling mountain peaks and stars.  Many sleep under the stars on one of the many beautiful tent platforms that dot the landscape.  Solidly built, wooden tent platforms are everywhere you look at Wedgemount Lake.  Strategically positioned, these platforms manage to maintain an amazingly secluded feel despite their numbers.  In all Wedgemount Lake has 20 of these tent areas.  Most are wooden, but several down by the lake shore are gravel, yet every bit as nice.  At a fast hiking pace Aerial Video of Wedge Glacieryou can reach Wedgemount Lake from the trailhead in just an hour and a half but at a leisurely or backpack laden pace you will likely take over two hours.  The trail is well marked and well used.  The steepness of the trail doesn't require any technical skill, however that last kilometre before the lake you will be scrambling on all fours quite a bit.  The elevation gain makes a tremendous difference when carrying a heavy backpack and unprepared for the exertion.  There is hardly a section of the trail that is not steeply uphill.  The first 15 minutes takes you into the deep forest and then across Wedgemount Creek.  This crashing creek can be heard from quite a distance and gives you a hint of the steepness of the trail to come.  The source of Wedgemount Creek is of course Wedgemount Lake which tumbles down almost 300 metres in the spectacular Wedgemount Falls.  You will be able to see Wedgemount Falls around the 5 kilometre mark along the trail.  It is far off to the right in the distance.  Despite the distance, you will hear it loud and clear and some easy to find and get to areas off the trail give amazing views of it.Panorama Ridge Aerial Video 1 Panorama Ridge is easily one of the most amazing hikes in Garibaldi Provincial Park.  The 15 kilometre hike from the trailhead at Rubble Creek to Panorama Ridge takes you through beautiful and deep forests, across countless idyllic streams, through meadows filled with flowers, and past dozens of jaw dropping viewpoints.  The amazing views start once you reach Taylor Meadows and get even more spectacular as the trail progresses.  Once you arrive at Panorama Ridge and its phenomenal vantage point, high above Garibaldi Park, you will stare in wonder.  Mesmerized first by Garibaldi Lake, far below you and looking unnaturally blue, the lake looks amazing surrounded by green, untouched wilderness and snow capped mountains.  The Table, the massive and unusual looking mountain with its bizarre flat top lays across the lake with the enormous Mount Garibaldi just beyond.  In the distance, where Garibaldi Lake ends, a massive glacier rises out of the blue and jagged crevasses can be seen even Panorama Ridge Aerial Video Part 2from such a great distance.  Behind you, Black Tusk lays across the valley.  Close to the same elevation as Panorama Ridge, you get this wonderful view of it.  Certainly the best and closest viewpoint to this iconic mountain.  Panorama Ridge sits, along with Black Tusk in the midst of some of the most popular and beautiful hiking trails in Garibaldi Park.  There are two main trailheads for Panorama Ridge, Cheakamus Lake and Rubble Creek.  Rubble Creek is the more popular starting point as it is a bit shorter, far more scenic and allows for the inclusion of the trail to Garibaldi Lake and the beautiful Taylor Meadows as well as Black Tusk.  The trail to Panorama Ridge from Rubble Creek is not so much difficult as it is long.  30 kilometres makes for a long 8-10 hour roundtrip hike.  Staying overnight, therefore is a great idea.  There are several excellent options for camping in the valleys around Panorama Ridge.

Panorama Ridge Aerial Video Part 3

The beautiful though often crowded Garibaldi Lake campsite, the less crowded and also beautiful Taylor Meadows campsite, the seldom crowded and serene Helm Creek campsite (located on the Cheakamus Lake side of Black Tusk).  The more adventurous bivouac on the far end of Panorama Ridge itself. As you hike along the spine of Panorama Ridge, it leads to quite a large, flat and level grassy area with breathtaking views. Perfectly south facing, this beautiful, grassy slope is always sunny, seldom hiked as it lays at the far end of Panorama Ridge , and beautifully insect free.

More Whistler Aerial Hiking Videos >>

Best Beach Parks                                                       Top 5 Best Whistler Hiking

Lakeside Park at Alta Lake in Whistler is a beautiful beach park just a short distance from Whistler Village.  Located on the Valley Trail, it is just 2 kilometres or a 30 Lakeside Park on Alta Lake in Whistlerminute walk, or 10 minute bike ride away.  Similar to the also popular Rainbow Park across the lake, Lakeside has a concession stand for food and drinks, picnic tables, BBQ stands, canoe and kayak rentals a huge grass field, pier, a sandy beach and an elaborate little kids play are.  Swimming and relaxing are the main draws to Lakeside Park, but fishing off the piers is a common sight as well.  Rainbow Park is one of Whistler's most popular swimming beaches and for good reason.  Rainbow Park on Alta Lake in Whistler BCThe beach is south facing so every morning the sun rises from behind Wedge Mountain and the whole park seems to glow.  From the dazzling reflecting from the snow off of Wedge, Blackcomb and Whistler mountains, to the amazing blue glow from Alta Lake.  All this framed in the dazzling green of the forest all around.  Though there are many great places to watch the sun rise in Whistler, Rainbow Blueberry Park on Alta Lake in WhistlerPark is one of the best.  Blueberry Park is a very scenic park on Alta Lake that most Whistler locals don't even know about.  If you have been to Rainbow Park you would have noticed three piers across Alta Lake surrounded by forest.  These public piers sit at the edge of Blueberry Park, with the Blueberry Trail running from one side of the forest to the other.  The beautiful, deep forest trail runs from the shores of Alta Lake in Alta Vista, up and across Blueberry Hill and descends again to reach Whistler Cay.  Along the trail there are several beautiful viewpoints of AltaWayside Park on Alta Lake in Whistler Lake in the foreground and the enormous Mount Sproatt beyond. Wayside Park in Whistler is one of several idyllic parks on Alta Lake.  Rainbow Park, Lakeside Park and Blueberry Park are also along the shore of this huge lake that cover much of the valley edged by Lost Lake Park in WhistlerWhistlerVillage.In the summer months, swimming and relaxing in the sun are the main attractions to Wayside Park.  The piers are a fantastic way to view Alta Lake as it stretches north, edged by forest, hills and mountains in the distance.  Canoeing, kayaking and paddleboarding are all popular from Wayside Park.  Lost Lake is a tranquil and secluded lake that hides in the forest extending from Whistler Village.  Just a 20 minute, leisurely walk or 5 minute bike ride along the well signed Valley Trail will lead you to this beautiful little lake.  The wide and paved Valley Trail turns into a wide and gravel trail as you enter Lost Lake Park.  There are plenty of nice viewpoints along the main trail as well as quite a few short trails that lead to several access points to the lake, some with great places to sit and relax in the sun and take in the view.

More of the Best Beach Parks in Whistler >>

Best Free Campsites                                                  Top 5 Best Whistler Hiking

#1 Northair Mine(4x4 Recommended - drive to site)        

Northair Mine is a surreal little world of colourful murals on abandoned cement foundations, Northair Mine Aerial Video - Free Whistler Campsitessurrounded by an astoundingly tranquil little lake in a secluded forest.  Just a short logging road off of the Callaghan Valley Road takes you to this unusual little abandoned mine.  You would have driven by the turnoff if you have been to Whistler Olympic Park, which is just a couple kilometres away.  Northair Mine gets its name from the Vancouver based mining company the Northair Group.  The mine was in production from 1976 and extracted 5 tons of gold before being abandoned in 1982.  Northair Mine is tricky to find and even when you near it, the turnoff is not obvious(see the map here for directions).  However, once you find it, it is quite a sight.  The area that encompasses Northair Mine is huge.  About 2 kilometres long, edged by a cliff on one side and a beautiful lake on the other.  A nice, smooth gravel road runs through the area, along the edge of the lake toward Whistler Olympic Park.  Another gravel road runs through the massive cement foundations of what must have been quite a large building.  Beautiful graffiti art covers some of the cement pilings and scattered remnants indicate that this skeleton of a building has been home to its share of gatherings since being abandoned.  Another aerial video showing more of the potential tent sites here.

#2 Callaghan Lake - Islands(canoe to island)

Callaghan Lake Island CampsiteCallaghan Lake Provincial Park has a main campsite area next to the lake that is pretty nice.  But for a spectacular place to put up a tent, the lake has some little islands.  If you do have a canoe or boat, cross the lake you will find several amazing, backcountry places to put your tent as well as an incredible little island.  All with phenomenal view of crystal clear, green water, trees, and snowy mountains.  If you are motivated and have a canoe you can paddle to the far end of the lake and take the difficult, though beautiful trail to Cirque Lake. Callaghan Lake is certainly one of the most convenient and beautiful places to camp before reaching Whistler, if for example, if you are driving in from out of town and want a great, free, convenient (except for the 8.5k logging road), place to spend the night.  Callaghan Lake Provincial Park is a relatively untouched wilderness of rugged mountainous terrain.  The valley walls were formed by relatively recent glaciation.  Evidence of this can be seen in the considerable glacial till and slide materials visible across the lake.  Around the lake you will see talus slopes, flat rock benches, cirques, hanging valleys, tarns, waterfalls and upland plateaus with bog

#3 Sproatt Alpine Trail - Lakeside(4x4 and difficult hike to lakes)

Mount Sproatt, or as it is known locally as simply "Sproatt", is one of the many towering mountains visible from Whistler Village.  Above and beyond Alta Lake, directly across from Whistler Mountain and Blackcomb Mountain.  Next time you walk through Whistler Village and cross the pedestrian bridge Sproatt Alpine Trail Campsite Videowith Village Gate Boulevard below you, you will see Mount Sproatt from this excellent vantage point.  It is the rocky giant, abruptly steep on one end and gently sloping on the other.  What you can't see from Whistler Village is the extraordinarily beautiful alpine paradise that lays beyond it.  Lakes and tarns everywhere you look.  Fields of alpine flowers and wonderfully mangled, yet strikingly beautiful forests of krummholz.  Hostile looking fields of boulders and absurdly placed erratics the size of RV's.  Beyond, of course, endless stunning view of distant, snowy mountains.  At the far end(Northair Mine) side of the trail you can 4x4 very close to some amazing alpine lakes(shown here) to camp beside.  Less than an hours hike will then get you to paradise.  Alternatively, you can hike the Alpine Sproatt Trail from the Whistler side and hike to the alpine in a couple hours(about 5k to the alpine).  There is an alpine hut near the Callaghan Valley(Northair Mine) end of the trail.  There is a nice trail from the hut to Sproatt Lake that you will see from the hut's sundeck.  It descends down the valley and only takes about 8 minutes to the lake.  The hut is located just past a trail junction and large clearing where you will see a large mapboard and atv tracks through the mud and grass.  The new Sproatt Alpine Trail branches off to the right just before this clearing and the hut is straight past the clearing and mapboard(see maps here).

#4 Whistler Train Wreck(hike/bike to sites)

Whistler Train Wreck Tent Site Over Cheakamus RiverFor convenience and beauty as a great, free place to camp in Whistler, Train Wreck would be hard to beat.  Decades ago a train derailed south of Whistler.  The cost to clean up the mess was evidently deemed too high, so seven train cars were left scattered next to the Cheakamus River.  As it turns out, time and local effort has transformed this mess into a wonderful work of art, an extraordinary bike park, and a great place to hike.  The Whistler Train Wreck.  The Cheakamus River winds its way, crashing and emerald green along the length of the Whistler Train Wreck, and there are several spectacular river vantage points that shouldn't be missed.  The whole length of the train wreck and Cheakamus River hike is 3 kilometres (each way) and the trails go along the beautiful river as well as several, widely spaced train wrecks.  The Whistler Train Wreck trailhead is best reached by starting at the easy to find, Flank Trail trailhead in Function Junction, just 8k south of Whistler Village.  The first part of the Train Wreck is not train wreckage, but instead some amazing views of the Cheakamus River.  This extraordinarily beautiful river crashes violently through here and various viewpoints can be found along the trail.  After a few amazing viewpoints, the Cheakamus River forces you back towards the train tracks.  Walk past this bend in the river by keeping well left of, off and away from the train tracks.  The trail picks up again on the left and descends into the forest again.  This is the stretch of forest that contains seven train wrecked cars strewn over one kilometre.  Some perched at the edge of the Cheakamus River, others mangled against trees.  It is amazing to see the impossibility of where they rest.. with huge trees all around.  In the decades since they crashed and wrecked here, trees have grown all around.

#5 Madeley Lake(drive to and easy 100 metre hike to campsites)

Madeley Lake is an amazing place to camp.  If looking for solitude at a paradise, mountain lake, Madeley Lake is hard to beat.  Though somewhat popular with fishing, Madeley Lake - Free Whistler Campingyou are still likely to rarely see anyone at the lake in the summer and never in the fall.  Once in a while you will see a car or two at the trailhead to Hanging Lake.  If you have a canoe, Madeley is a great place to paddle around or just float in the sun.  There is a long forgotten campsite around the far end of the lake that you can walk to in about 5 minutes.  Some old picnic tables, fire rings, several tent clearings and a beautiful gravel, sun-facing beach.  A wonderfully crashing creek runs along the trail and campsite making the area absurdly idyllic.  If you are motivated the Madeley Lake trail runs around the back of the lake from the campsite and up to Hanging Lake, then on to Rainbow Lake.  If you can manage it, get someone to drop you off at Madeley, then spend a weekend hiking through paradise and come out at Rainbow Park on Alta Lake!  You can even do it in a day in about 8-9 hours at a somewhat relaxed pace.  There are signs the entire way(except around the Madeley Lake campsite where there are none).

Whistler Hiking Map Guide

Previous Whistler Driving Destination - Meager Creek Hot SpringsMore Whistler Drives - Keyhole Hot Springs

 

 

 

Vancouver Hiking TrailsSquamish Hiking TrailsWhistler and Garibaldi Park hiking maps and trail info