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Pay Campsites In and Around Whistler

Panorama Ridge Aerial Video - Whistler TrailsRusset Lake Aerial Video - Whistler AerialWedgemount Lake Aerial Video - Whistler Trails

Garibaldi Provincial Park, which surrounds Whistler on three sides has pay-to-use campsites.  The campsites are regularly maintained, well designed and located in spectacular settings.  Million dollar views everywhere you look.  Wedgemount Lake, Taylor Meadows, Garibaldi Lake, Helm Creek, Russet Lake and Cheakamus Lake all have wonderful, pay-to-use campgrounds.  $10 per adult camper, payable online only.

Cheakamus Lake CampsiteCheakamus Lake is an easy, relaxing hike in Garibaldi Park just a short, 16k drive from Whistler Village.  The trail to the lake is in an amazing forest of giant cedars.  The first 3k of the trail takes you along the beautiful Cheakamus River to the start of Cheakamus Lake and the first campsite area.  There are 10 very nice and hidden tent pads on or near the lake shore.  There is excellent water from several creeks in the area and a bear proof food hang as well as tidy outhouses here.  Another 3k further on the trail takes you to some beautiful viewpoints on the ever increasingly majestic Cheakamus Lake trail.  Huge trees, turquoise lake, snow capped mountains, and even the occasional bear siting make this hike one of Whistler's best and most family and kid friendly hikes around.  The trail is never strenuous and constantly beautiful with the wonderful smells that come with an old growth cedar forest.  The campsite at 6k on the Cheakamus Lake trail consists of another 7 tent sites beautifully blended into the surroundings, another bear proof food hang and outhouse...

Why should you camp at Cheakamus Lake?

Beautiful, huge tree forest, easy kid friendly trail, pristine Garibaldi Park wilderness and a spectacular and huge lake.  Excellent campsites and numerous hidden beaches and wonderful, though very cold, swimming.  Known for great fishing.

More Hiking and Camping at Cheakamus Lake in Garibaldi Provincial Park, Whistler >>

Garibaldi Lake Campsite ViewGaribaldi Lake is the centre and base for much of the hiking in Garibaldi Park.  The Garibaldi Lake campsite is located on the amazing, turquoise shores of this massive and mostly undisturbed mountain lake.  There are no trails around the perimeter of the lake with the exception of the small section leading to the campsite, so your view of the lake is a sea of unnaturally coloured water ringed by swaths of forest and a magnificent glacier towering in the distance.  The water is painfully cold, though plenty of brave hikers swim here as well as camp.  The camping area is well laid out and stretches deep into the forest with 50 tent clearings.  You can, except for the busiest of days, put your tent out of earshot and sight of others.  The trail to Garibaldi Lake from the Rubble Creek trailhead, just off of the Sea to Sky Highway takes about two hours.  You gain a fair amount of elevation, 900 metres in just 9 kilometres, trailhead to lake.  Partway along the trail to Garibaldi Lake the trail forks.  Right to Garibaldi Lake and left goes to another beautiful campground, Taylor Meadows.  Past Taylor Meadows you can link back to Garibaldi Lake by yet another linking trail.  At every trail for there are nice and clear signs and sometimes maps, showing where and how far everything is...

Why should you hike to Garibaldi Lake?

Garibaldi Lake is amazingly beautiful with its huge size and unbelievable colour.  The trails are beautiful and well signed and laid out in the well organized Garibaldi Park.  The trails are relatively easy and there is quite a lot to see.  Black Tusk, Taylor Meadows and Panorama Ridge are all within hiking distance and some of the most amazing hikes around.

More Hiking Info for Garibaldi Lake in Garibaldi Provincial Park, Whistler >>

Helm Creek in Garibaldi Provincial Park, WhistlerHelm Creek is a beautiful, meandering creek that winds its way from beyond Black Tusk, down the valley to the wonderful campground that takes its name. From the Helm Creek Campground it descends further along the Helm Creek Trail, until it joins the Cheakamus River near where it leaves Cheakamus Lake.  The location of Helm Creek Campground has two tremendous advantages. First it is just a great location in Garibaldi Park. About halfway between Cheakamus Lake and Black Tusk it lays in some amazingly scenic areas. Beautiful, climbable mountains all around. Amazing fields of snow that run all the way to the base of Black Tusk. Rivers, creeks and waterfalls everywhere you turn. And the campground area itself is very nice. A large, grassy field ringed by trees and Helm Creek. The area really has no trails except the Helm Creek trail that runs past it, but there are infinitely numerous directions you can wander. Exploring in any direction takes you to more and more pristine, green fields, streams, pocket lakes and mountain views.  Though most just use it as a base to extend onto Black Tusk, it is a great base for so much more. Helm Peak, Corrie Peak, Cinder Cone, Empetrum Peak as well as the more frequented Panorama Ridge, Black Tusk and Garibaldi Lake.  The second great aspect of Helm Creek as a campground is that it is quiet and serene when compared with the other two area campgrounds. Garibaldi Lake and Taylor Meadows are very busy all summer long. In fact there is a posting part way up the trail to Garibaldi Lake indicating how crowded it is and if it is full.

Why should you camp at Helm Creek Campground?

Though Helm Creek is generally called Helm Creek Campground it is somewhat of a destination on its own.  Beautiful scenery, relaxing area.  It is an incredible base camp allowing access to the less hiked but arguably most spectacular area of Garibaldi Park.  You can hike in several directions from Helm Creek and because you are in the alpine you don't need to follow a trail.  With a topo map you can venture any number of marvelous places

More Hiking and Camping Info for Helm Creek in Garibaldi Park >>

Nairn Falls Provincial Park - CampsiteNairn Falls is a wonderful, crashing and chaotic waterfall that surrounds you from the deluxe viewing platform that allows you to safely watch it from above.  The beautiful, green water rushes through the deep and angular channels of rock.  Though the BC Parks website describes Nairn Falls as 60 metres high, the description is misleading.  The falls crash through various narrow and wide areas, and though the cumulative drop is 60 metres, what you see is a series of 10 to 20 metre falls.  There are a nicely constructed railing, fence and viewing area and walkway that guides you to the best views.  With such abruptly steep rock all around, the area would be potentially dangerous.  Evidently there have been deaths here before.  A cross, reverently placed across the chasm from the viewing platform, indicates of some tragic event.  Nairn Falls Provincial Park is located just a short 20 minute drive north of Whistler.  From the large parking lot the well marked trail runs along the Green River for 1.2k to Nairn Falls.  The trail is very easy and is hike-able year-round and the spacious campground is open all summer long.

Why should you camp at Nairn Falls?

Nairn Falls is a short and easy, family friendly hike to a very impressive waterfall.  Perfect for an afternoon drive/hike/picnic from Whistler.  Camping facilities are very well organized and can accommodate hundreds of campers as well as RV's

More Camping Info for Nairn Falls Provincial Park >>

Russet Lake CampsitesRusset Lake, in Garibaldi Park is the wonderfully expansive hiking area located just a few spectacular steps from Whistler.  Among the various ways to reach Russet Lake, possibly the most impressive are the approaches from either the Musical Bumps Trail or the High Note Trail.  Both begin from high up on Whistler Mountain.  Musical Bumps starts near the Roundhouse on Whistler and the High Note Trail begins at the top of Whistler near the Peak Chair.  Though Russet Lake is not terribly impressive in terms of size or colour, the valley around it is remarkably beautiful.  The colours change from moment to moment in and extraordinary way.  The distinctive colour of the Fissile and the stark grey of the mountains around contrast amazingly with the blue of the lake and green grass in the valley.  So many different factors fill the place with colour.  There are, in fact, several ways to get to hike Russet Lake.  The Singing Pass Trail from the base of Whistler Mountain near the Whistler Gondola.  The Musical Bumps Trail that begins near the top of the Whistler Gondola.  The High Note Trail that begins at the top of the Peak Chair on Whistler Mountain.  There is an increasingly popular route that begins from Blackcomb Mountain.  And finally, a very infrequently hiked route from Cheakamus Lake that runs along Singing Creek...

Why should you camp at Russet Lake?

Russet Lake is certainly one of the most amazing places in Whistler to camp .  The valley that Russet Lake sits in is spectacular.  Glacier below, the Fissile above and inviting trails in all directions make this a camping paradise.  And a free-to-use hut makes the place even more inviting.

More Hiking and Camping Info for Russet Lake in Whistler >>

Skookumchuck Hot Springs 96k from Whistler VillageSkookumchuck Hot Springs, open year-round and located two hours north of Whistler along the edge of the huge Lillooet River.The name Skookumchuck means "strong water" in the language of the Chinook people of the Pacific Northwest.  The name is associated with the hot springs because of the nearby First Nation community of Skatin, which was once called Skookumchuck.  The Skookumchuck Hot Springs were also once known as St. Agnes Well during the days of the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush, but that name has fallen into disuse.  They are also known locally by the Skatin name as the T'sek Hot Springs.  See a short history of Skookumchuck Hot Springs here. The hot springs start in a pool which is far to hot to use so there are a network of tubes emanating from this pool to feed a ramshackle array of tubs.  There are five tubs, which include one very large one under an A-frame which could hold 10 people and is beautifully comfortable...

Why should you camp at Skookumchuck Hot Springs?

Skookumchuck is the easiest and most convenient hot springs from Whistler.  You can easily visit in just a day trip or stay in the very nice campground at the edge of the beautiful Lillooet River.

More Info, Details and Directions to Skookumchuck Hot Springs >>

Sloquet Hot Springs 142k from Whistler VillageSloquet Hot Springs is a wonderfully wild set of shallow, man-made pools fed by a small, all natural, and very hot, waterfall.  The pools stretch from the waterfall to the large and crashing Sloquet River. The large, spread out campsite for the hot springs lies a short 5 minute walk from the springs.  You have to follow a dark and quickly descending trail toward the crashing river. As you near, you can smell the unusual, but kind of nice hot springs scent, and you see steam rising all around you, some steam rising, bizarrely, out of the grass clearing on the edge of the river. On your left a rising cliff, on your right the crashing river.  The path narrows and steepens, leading to a large fallen tree which the trail seems to run to. So huge though as to not worry you walking the length of. Then, there it is. The massive fallen tree flanks it. Nestled between the tree and a cliff, in a large triangular area, with the river forming the third side are the Sloquet Hot Springs.  Sloquet Hot Springs is 142 kilometres from Whistler, which translates to well over 3 hours of driving.  Much of the driving is along the In-Shuck-Ch Forest Service Road, which runs the length of the very scenic Lillooet Lake and river.  This gravel road takes you well into the wilderness, far from civilization and past quite a few nice sights along the way.

Why should you drive to Sloquet Hot Springs?

Sloquet Hot Springs is about as natural as you can get.  The hot water pours down a waterfall from the rock face that the pools sit at the base of.  The fairly long drive is part of the adventure with plenty of possible stops along the way.  The campground is often lively, fun, and beautifully separated, well out of earshot of the pools.

More Info, Details and Directions to Sloquet Hot Springs >>

Taylor Meadows Campground in WhistlerTaylor Meadows is a beautiful Garibaldi Park campsite and alternative to the much busier Garibaldi Lake campsite. Located in between Garibaldi Lake and Black Tusk itself. It is reached from the same trailhead to Garibaldi Lake.  There are 40 very nice tent platforms, toilets, a good water source and a food cache,  all in the lush forest of Taylor Meadows with the distant view of Black Tusk.  Generally Taylor Meadows is not a destination, but part of a circle route.  For example, trailhead to Taylor Meadows, Taylor Meadows to Black Tusk or Panorama Ridge, then return via Garibaldi Lake.  This makes for a long hike at 30k, which is why tenting at this perfectly beautiful, and perfectly located Taylor Meadows Campsite, is a great idea.  Taylor Meadows Campsite gets very busy at times as well with 40 campsites with full service (water, security, etc) and fees (May 1 - Nov 15).  There are some small rivers close by but no swimming.  The draw for Taylor Meadows camping is the wonderful location.  It lays in a beautiful forested meadow full of hills and flowers and views of the towering Black Tusk.  It has a less crowded feel than Garibaldi Lake does, though bear in mind that even when crowded these campsites don't feel crowded - they are just that organized and thick with trees and hills.  Also, if you were to feel crowded, you could easily wander in any of several directions and become immersed in the wonderful forest and beautiful desolation in these vast meadows of Garibaldi Park.

Why should you camp at Taylor Meadows?

Though generally used as a base camp for further hiking into Garibaldi Park, Taylor Meadows is a good hiking destination on its own.  Incredible views all around, Taylor Meadows can be hiked as part of a circle route, starting 5k from the Rubble Creek trailhead.  The trail forks and taking either fork will eventually bring you back via the opposite fork.  As a basecamp, Taylor Meadows is well located to tackle Black Tusk, Garibaldi Lake, Panorama Ridge and much more.

More Campsite Info for Taylor Meadows in Whistler >>

Wedgemount Lake in Garibaldi ParkIf you were to search your whole life for an absolutely amazing, astoundingly perfect, alpine hiking paradise, you'd have trouble finding a place as great as Wedgemount Lake in Garibaldi Park. To start with, the lake is breathtaking. Every angle you look at it and every hour of the day it alters its appearance dramatically. From its wonderful turquoise, marble-like appearance reflecting bronze mountains at sunrise and sunset. To its startlingly vivid appearance in the darkness of night. Reflecting stars are as clear looking down on the lake as they are looking up at the sky.  The massive valley that contains Wedgemount Lake is ringed by impressive mountains and the ever-present Wedgemount Glacier that continuously pulls your attention to it. The trail that leads around the lake to the glacier takes only 20-30 minutes and is quite amazing to explore. Wedgemount Glacier, at its edge, has what is called a glacier window. A hugeWedgemount Lake Topo Map ice cave, created out of the melting underneath this huge, crushing mass of ice. You can get right up close to this impressive ice cave and have a drink of what was just moments before ice left thousands of years ago before Wedgemount Lake was called Wedgemount Lake...

Why should you hike to Wedgemount Lake?

One of the most spectacular hikes in Garibaldi Park.  Close to Whistler, the trailhead is only about 10-20 minutes away.  Though the hike is hard and steep, it is short.  A fit person can hike the trail in under 1.5 hours (one way).  There are endless mountains, glaciers and hidden trails to explore.  Wonderful and free hut to use with a million dollar view of the lake.  The somewhat difficulty of the hike makes it less used than many other nearby trails.

More Camping Info for Wedgemount Lake in Garibaldi Provincial Park >>

Garibaldi Park Map Guide

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Wedgemount Lake Aerial VideoWedgemount Lake Aerial Video - Whistler TrailsMadeley Lake Aerial Video - Whistler Trails

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