• An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow

Wedgemount Falls in Garibaldi Provincial Park, Whistler

 

Wedge Falls at Wedgemount Lake in Garibaldi Park

Wedgemount Falls                                                                   Whistler Waterfalls

Wedgemount Falls can be seen along the trail to Wedgemount Lake.  As the falls flow directly from Wedgemount Lake, they are located about three quarters of the hiking distance from the trailhead.  At almost 300 metres high, Wedgemount Falls can be heard long before being visible.  The forest cover is very thick for most of the trail to Wedgemount Lake so getting a clear look at the falls is difficult.  There is one spot, however, where you will catch sight of them, still kilometres away, yet with such a enormously tall waterfall, you would have to see them from a distance to get it all in view.

Wedgemount Lake, Garibaldi Park                                      Whistler Hiking Trails

Wedgemount Lake Campsite Tent ViewWedgemount Lake is one of the most spectacular hikes in Garibaldi Park. Though it is a relentlessly exhausting, steep hike, it is mercifully short at only 7 kilometres (one way).  The elevation gain in that short distance is over 1200 metres which makes it a much steeper hike than most other Whistler hiking trails.  Compared with other Whistler hikes, Wedgemount Lake is half the roundtrip distance of either Black Tusk or Panorama Ridge, for example,  at 13.5k and 15k respectively (one way).

Wedgemount Lake itself is a magnificent destination for a day hike or spectacular overnight beneath the dazzling mountain peaks and stars.  Many sleep under the stars on one of the many beautiful tent platforms that dot the landscape.  Solidly built, wooden tent platforms are everywhere you look at Wedgemount Lake.  Strategically positioned, these platforms manage to maintain an amazingly secluded feel despite their numbers.  In all Wedgemount Lake has 20 of these tent areas.  Most are wooden, but several down by the lake shore are gravel, yet every bit as nice.

Wedgemount Falls in WhistlerAt a fast hiking pace you can reach Wedgemount Lake from the trailhead in just an hour and a half but at a leisurely or backpack laden pace you will likely take over two hours.  The trail is well marked and well used.  The steepness of the trail doesn't require any technical skill, however that last kilometre before the lake you will be scrambling on all fours quite a bit.

The elevation gain makes a tremendous difference when carrying a heavy backpack and unprepared for the exertion.  There is hardly a section of the trail that is not steeply uphill.  The first 15 minutes takes you into the deep forest and then across Wedgemount Creek.  This crashing creek can be heard from quite a distance and gives you a hint of the steepness of the trail to come.

The source of Wedgemount Creek is of course Wedgemount Lake which tumbles down almost 300 metres in the spectacular Wedgemount Falls.  You will be able to see Wedgemount Falls around the 5 kilometre mark along the trail.  It is far off to the right in the distance.  Despite the distance, you will hear it loud and clear and some easy to find and get to areas off the trail give amazing views of it.

 

Outhouses aka Toilets at Wedgemount LakeThere is an outhouse (toilet), at the trailhead to Wedgemount Lake.  Another one a few metres from the Wedge Hut and tent platforms at Wedgemount Lake.  And a third, almost hidden toilet down near the lakeside tent platforms.  You will spot an unusual looking, plastic box in the scree slope along the trail to the lake.  This is a futuristic looking outhouse that is more convenient to the campsites at the lake.  All the outhouses in Garibaldi Park are serviced frequently and even equipped with toilet paper, however, bringing your own is always a good idea as it inevitably runs out sometimes.  If you are unfamiliar with outhouses, they consist of, (usually) a very small wooden room with a small window for light.  Sometimes the outhouse is built above a pit in the ground for waste, but in the case of the Wedgemount Lake outhouse it is raised above a massive waste tank that is routinely replaced by helicopter.  They are unavoidably disgusting and fly ridden despite the frequent and heroic efforts of excellent BC Parks staff.

 

Not a Dog Friendly Hiking TrailDogs are not permitted on the Wedgemount Lake trail or any other Garibaldi Provincial Park trails out of courtesy to the resident animals of the park.  There are a large number of black bears in the park and encounters with dogs result in unpredictable and potentially dangerous conflicts.  There are quite a few excellent hiking trails in Whistler that are dog friendly.  Whistler's Valley Trail and Lost Lake Trails are dog friendly and run throughout Whistler.  The Sea to Sky Trail, which runs over 30 kilometres through Whistler is a paradise trail for dogs as it runs through numerous parks, beaches and forests.  Ancient Cedars is a nice, dog friendly hike that is 5k roundtrip and takes you into a thousand year old forest.  Train Wreck is also dog friendly.  The trailhead, marked Flank Trail is located in Function Junction, just a short drive south of Whistler Village.  Further south you will come to Brandywine Falls, which is a short, 2k (roundtrip) dog friendly hike to the amazing falls.  About 25 minutes north of Whistler, Nairn Falls is another beautiful and dog friendly hiking trails.  For a look at some of the best dog friendly hikes in Whistler try here.. And for some more challenging dog friendly hikes try here..

Trailhead Directions & Trail Map          Printer, Smartphone and Tablet Friendly

Printer, smartphone and tablet friendly.  Designed to fit standard printers and copiers.  To print: Right Click on the map, save image as, save to desktop, then open the image and print on standard size printer paper.  Cell coverage usually reaches to Wedgemount Lake so you will likely be able to access the internet if you have a data plan, however saving this image may be a good idea.

Wedgemount Lake Printable Trail Map and Driving Directions

Other Whistler Area Waterfalls                                           Whistler Hiking Trails

Alexander Falls in WhistlerAlexander Falls is a very impressive 43 metre/141foot waterfall just 30 to 40 minutes south of Whistler in the Callaghan Valley.  Open year-round and located just before Whistler Olympic Park where several of the 2010 Olympic events were held.  There is a nice viewing platform on the edge of the cliff across from the falls which crash fantastically into the valley below.  The parking area and viewing platform at Alexander Falls is one big area just 40 metres from the main road (to Whistler Olympic Park). The adventurous can find the obscure trail that leads to both the top of the falls as well as, with Brandywine Falls Provincial Park in Whistlergreat difficulty, to the base of the falls.  The drive to Alexander Falls is fantastic and with lots to see.  As soon as you turn off from the Sea to Sky Highway into the Callaghan Valley you ascend quickly into the mountains.  Bears along the roadside are frequently seen as they seem to have a particular fondness for the fields of grass that grow in the sunny meadows that surround this recently constructed, paved road. Rainbow Falls in WhistlerBrandywine Falls: (20 minute drive south of Whistler): Easy, flat trail, 1k hike to falls.  Brandywine Falls is a beautiful stop in between Squamish and Whistler.  It's about 25 minutes north of Squamish, 11k south of Whistler.  Amazing! Rainbow Falls: (20 minute drive north of Whistler): Steep but short trail, 0.5k hike to falls. The beautiful and easily accessible Rainbow Falls are located just a short, half kilometre from the Rainbow Lake trailhead.  Most hikers don't notice or make the short detour to take a look Shannon Falls in Squamish South of Whistlerat Rainbow Falls on their way to Rainbow Lake.  Rainbow Falls is a crashing section of falls that runs for several metres and visible at several locations.  Shannon Falls towers above Howe Sound at 335 metres as the third tallest falls in BC.  The wonderful, though very short trail winds through a beautiful old growth forest to get to the base of the falls.  From your car to the viewpoint takes only about four minutes, however the trail continues a bit further to a higher viewpoint. Nairn Falls is a wonderful, crashing and chaotic waterfallNairn Falls Provincial Park near Whistler that surrounds you from the deluxe viewing platform that allows you to safely watch it from above.  The beautiful, green water rushes through the deep and angular channels of rock. Though the BC Parks website describes Nairn Falls as 60 metres high, the description is misleading.  The falls crash through various narrow and wide areas, and though the cumulative drop is 60 metres, what you see is a series of 10 to 20 metre falls.  There are a nicely constructed railing, fence and viewing area and walkway that guides you to the best views.  With such abruptly steep rock all around, the area would be potentially dangerous.  Evidently there have been deaths here before.  A cross, reverently placed across the chasm from the viewing platform, indicates of some tragic event.

Whistler Garibaldi Park Hiking Topo Map Guide

 

Walking Routes to Parks from Whistler VillageDriving Destinations around WhistlerHiking Trails Whistler and Garibaldi Provincial Park