Sproatt Hike RatingMount Sproatt, or as it is known locally as just Sproatt, is one of the many towering mountains visible from Whistler Village. Above and beyond Alta Lake, directly across from Whistler Mountain and Blackcomb Mountain, you will see this quiet giant. Its unremarkable appearance hides the growing network of trails that stretch through some startlingly beautiful terrain.

  • Huge network of trails
  • Wild, hostile terrain rarely visited by humans
  • Connecting trails to Rainbow, Hanging & Madeley
  • No crowds & endless idyllic tarns to swim
  • Dozens of perfect spots for a tent
  • Vast terrain full of adventurous routes
  • Challenging and very rewarding
  • Easy to get lost in the vast alpine
  • No grand turquoise lakes like Wedge
  • Need a 4x4 to get close to the trailhead

Whistler & Garibaldi Hiking

Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerAlexander Falls  Moderate Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyAncient Cedars  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerBlack Tusk  Pay Use Hiking Trail WhistlerBlackcomb Mountain  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerBrandywine Falls  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyBrandywine Meadows  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyBrew Lake  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerCallaghan Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerCheakamus Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyCheakamus River  Whistler Hiking Trail HardCirque Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyFlank Trail  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerGaribaldi Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerGaribaldi Park  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerHelm Creek  Moderate Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyJane Lakes  Joffre Lakes Hike in Whistler in SeptemberJoffre Lakes  Moderate Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyKeyhole Hot Springs  Hiking Trail Hard Dog FriendlyLogger’s Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyMadeley Lake  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyMeager Hot Springs Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerNairn Falls  Whistler Hiking Trail HardNewt Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerPanorama Ridge  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyParkhurst Ghost Town  Hiking Trail Hard Dog FriendlyRainbow Falls  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerRainbow Lake  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyRing Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerRusset Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasySea to Sky Trail  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerSkookumchuck Hot Springs  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerSloquet Hot Springs  Sproatt East  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerSproatt West  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerTaylor Meadows  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyTrain Wreck  Hiking Trail Hard - Whistler TrailsWedgemount Lake  Pay Use Hiking Trail WhistlerWhistler Mountain

  Winter Hiking WhistlerJanuary  Winter Hiking WhistlerFebruary  Spring Hiking WhistlerMarch  Spring Hiking WhistlerApril  Spring Hiking WhistlerMay  Summer Hiking WhistlerJune  Summer Hiking WhistlerJuly  Summer Hiking WhistlerAugust  Fall Hiking WhistlerSeptember  Fall Hiking WhistlerOctober  Fall Hiking WhistlerNovember  Winter Hiking WhistlerDecember

Next time you walk through Whistler Village and cross the pedestrian bridge(with Village Gate Boulevard below you), you will see Mount Sproatt in the distance. It is the rocky giant, abruptly steep on one end and gently sloping on the other. At its summit you may be able to make out the small weather recording structure.  What you can't see from Whistler Village is the extraordinarily beautiful alpine paradise that lays beyond it. Lakes and tarns everywhere you look. Fields of alpine flowers and wonderfully mangled, yet strikingly beautiful forests of krummholz.  Hostile looking fields of boulders and absurdly placed erratic the size of RV's. Beyond, of course, endless stunning view of distant, snowy mountains. From the towering elevation of much of the Sproatt hiking trail network, you often look across or even down on distant mountains.  Rainbow Mountain looks incredible from much of the trail. Four teeth-like, jagged grey peaks in a row that face you from Rainbow Mountain, just 5 kilometres away look enormous.  A couple kilometres closer you spot Hanging Lake and the Lord of the Rings style valley that stretches 2 kilometres from its shores to the abrupt cliffs at your feet. Several times along the trail you see the clearly defined ski runs on Whistler Mountain and Blackcomb Mountain and once in a while you can spot Alta Lake and Whistler Village.

Northair Mine and Sproatt West v12

There are a several ways to hike to the summit of Mount Sproatt, though two main routes stand out, Sproatt West and Sproatt East.  The Sproatt West (Northair) route starts way up in the Callaghan Valley past the old, abandoned Northair Mine.  An increasingly brutal 4x4 road extends past the old gold mine for a couple kilometres before ending at the start of the With a Twist trail.  With a Twist takes you up into the alpine along a beautiful and very scenic route through the expansive wilderness.  After 3.3 kilometres, With a Twist ends at a fork in the trail.  Right descends down the mountain towards Function Junction via the Into the Mystic trail.  The left fork keeps you in the alpine heading towards the summit of Mount Sproatt along the On the Rocks trail.  On the Rocks is 3.6 kilometres long and takes you through more magnificent alpine and past Tonic Peak(1803m).  On the Rocks ends at another trail fork.  Right leads down toward Function Junction on the Lord of the Squirrels trail.  The trail to the left continues on to the Mount Sproatt for 2.5 kilometrs to the summit viewpoint via the Happy Hour trail.  The summit viewpoint has a big viewing platform overlooking Whistler Valley.  The actual summit of Sproatt is about 600 metres back from the viewpoint and towers over the valley at 1834 metres.  Though the viewpoint is a few metres lower in elevation, its position is more steeply overlooking the valley and much nicer.

Tent in the Sproatt Alpine

Trail to Mount Sproatt from Callaghan Valley

Mount Sproatt Hiking

The Sproatt Cabin

Sproatt Lake from the Sproatt Cabin

Tent in the Sproatt Alpine

 

Sproatt Tent Aerial View

Sproatt Tent Aerial View

 

Mount Sproatt Hiking Trails

Mount Sproatt Hike in Whistler

Sproatt Alpine View of Hanging Lake

Sproatt Alpine View of Rainbow Mountain

Mount Sproatt Aerial View

Mount Sproatt Aerial View

Mount Sproatt Aerial View

Mount Sproatt Aerial View

Mount Sproatt Aerial View

Mount Sproatt View of Black Tusk

Mount Sproatt View of Black Tusk

Mount Sproatt Hiking Trails Map

Mount Sproatt Hiking Trails MapThe Sproatt hiking trail network is still being built by volunteer and paid trail builders from WORCA(Whistler Off Road Cycling Association).  Construction is still underway from both ends of the trail.  One end being the Function Junction, Flank Trail end and the other being the Callaghan Valley, Northair Mine end, more than 10 kilometres away.  If you don't mind a bit of a drive and a couple kilometres of very bad forest service roads, then the Northair Mine end is the more scenic and easier choice.  The alpine terrain from that end is spectacular and if you manage to 4x4(or atv) close to the trailhead, then the amazing alpine views are less than an hour away on foot.

Sproatt Detailed Map v4

Camping on Sproatt

There are dozens of amazing places to put up a tent along the vast Mount Sproatt trail network, though none are marked or maintained.  Sproatt is the wonderfully wild alpine side of Whistler Valley, so you simply spot an amazing cliff outcrop, serene tarn, or majestic alpine lake, and set up your tent.  One thing to keep in mind, however, is that much of the Sproatt alpine north and east of the trail is part of Whistler's water supply and camping is not allowed.  There are mapboards that show the watershed areas, but an easy way to understand where you can and can't camp is by looking at the flow of water where you want to camp.  If the streams and lakes around you flow toward Rainbow Lake and Twentyone Mile Creek, then you can't camp.  The dividing line is the ridge that runs from Mount Sproatt to Tonic Peak, then bends north to Gin Peak.  Rainbow Lake and Twentyone Mile Creek are north and east of this ridge, so camping is OK, west and south of this.  The entire trail from Function Junction to the alpine is good for camping and there are endless beautiful, rock outcrops/cliffs to camp, though water is often not convenient.

Mount Sproatt Tent - Hike in Whistler

Mount Sproatt Tent - Hike in Whistler

Mount Sproatt Tent - Hike in Whistler

Hut Near SproattThere is an alpine hut near the Callaghan Valley(Northair Mine) end of the trail.  It is owned by Canadian Wilderness Adventures as their snowmobile hut.  Canadian has a tenure in the area to run snowmobile tours here in the winter.  There is a lock on the door, however it has an amazing view of the valley below and Sproatt Lake, and stopping there for lunch on their sundeck is very scenic.  Out of courtesy to Canadian Wilderness Adventures, you should not disturb anything of theirs.  There is a nice trail from the hut to Sproatt Lake that you will see from the hut's sundeck.  It descends down the valley and only takes about 8 minutes to the lake.  The hut is located just past a trail junction and large clearing where you will see a large mapboard and atv tracks through the mud and grass.  The trail to Mount Sproatt branches off to the right just before this clearing and the hut is straight past the clearing and mapboard.

The Sproatt Cabin

The Sproatt Cabin

The Sproatt Cabin

The Sproatt Cabin

The Sproatt Cabin

Restrictions and Concerns on Mount Sproatt

No Campfires AllowedSproatt in Not Dog FriendlyMany Whistler area hiking trails are not dog friendly, and unfortunately most of Mount Sproatt prohibits dogs.  Many of Mount Sproatt's creeks flow into Whistler's water supply and dogs are strictly forbidden anywhere close to water sources.  Dogs also pose an increasingly possibility of encountering grizzly bears on Sproatt.  Grizzly bear sightings on the Mount Sproatt side of the valley have increased over the past few summers.  For the foreseeable future, it seems, encounters with grizzly bears on Mount Sproatt will be not as rare as previous years.  Dog encounters with bears is well-known to drastically increase the chance of provoking a bear to sudden bursts of unpredictability.  Campfires are also prohibited on Mount Sproatt due to the significant risk of wildfires in BC.  Camping is allowed as much of Mount Sproatt is on Crown Land, however definitely not on the watershed side of the mountain.  Check out the map for Rainbow Lake shown further down the page for the watershed perimeter.

Mount Sproatt Aerial Views

Trailhead Directions to Sproatt

Parking & Trailhead DirectionsParking for the Sproatt Alpine Trail is easy to find on the Whistler(Function Junction) end and difficult and confusing on the Callaghan Valley(Northair Mine) end of the trail.  If you don't have a 4x4 vehicle and don't want the hassle of finding the trailhead, then the Whistler side is your best bet. To get to the trailhead for the Flank Trail which leads to the Sproatt Alpine Trail, drive 7.6 kilometres south of Whistler Village. At the traffic lights at Function Junction turn left onto Cheakamus Lake Rd, then immediately left again in the the huge parking lot for the Cheakamus Community Forest(aka Interpretive Forest). Park here then walk or bike to the Flank Trail. If you have a 4x4 and don't mind some adventurous logging roads then you should use the Callaghan Valley(Northair Mine) end of the trail. This end of the trail is spectacular right from the start and the logging road to access it is pretty amazing as well. The logging road gives you almost constant views looking down on the Callaghan Valley and the hiking trail from this end opens up to the alpine much faster than the Whistler end of the trail. Depending on how close you park to the trailhead, you could be in the alpine in as little as 30 minutes. On the Whistler side this takes about 2 hours to reach the alpine.

Sproatt Alpine Function Junction Trailhead

Sproatt Flank Trail Trailhead in FunctionTo get to the Function Junction - Flank Trail trailhead that connects to the new Flank Alpine Trail, zero your odometer at Village Gate Blvd and drive south(toward Vancouver) for 7.6 kilometres.  At the traffic lights at Function Junction turn left onto Cheakamus Lake Rd, then immediately left again in the the huge parking lot for the Cheakamus Community Forest(aka Interpretive Forest).  Park here then walk or bike to the Flank Trail trailhead.  Follow this easy and wide trail as it climbs quickly into deep forest.  In about 15 minutes you will cross a creek and the trail bends right, then left, then ascends quickly.  Look for the trail on your left here before the trail bends right again and levels off.  There may be a small ribbon in the trees here and soon there will be a large trail sign and mapboard.  From here you will see trail markers quite frequently and the trail is fairly well worn.  You will come to a fork in the trail in about 20 minutes, be sure to bear left at this fork and continue.

Sproatt Alpine Callaghan Valley Trailhead

Sproatt Alpine Trailheads Callaghan Valley End is BrutalThe Callaghan Valley trailhead to Sproatt is by far the better of the two trailheads.  Unfortunately it requires a very capable 4x4 and brave 4x4 driver to get close to.  You can however, get reasonably close to the trailhead by parking a kilometre or so past Northair Mine which gets you less than 1.5 hours from the trailhead. To get to the Callaghan Valley(Northair Mine) trailhead to the Sproatt Alpine Trail requires some 4x4 driving and some tricky navigating.  You may be able to drive to Northair Mine without a 4x4 as you occasionally see a car parked there, there are a couple deep washouts 2 kilometres before the mine.  These washouts are no problem for an average 4x4, but a car would have considerable difficulty.  Northair Mine is located way up in the beautiful Callaghan Valley.  From Whistler Village, drive south on the Sea to Sky Highway for 13.8 kilometres and turn right onto Callaghan Valley Road.  Drive up into the Callaghan Valley for 7.6 kilometres and just after you cross the bridge over Callaghan Creek turn right onto the Callaghan Creek forest service road.  The gravel road is pretty good for the first couple kilometres until you make a sharp left turn and the road deteriorates quickly.  Still manageable by most vehicles, however there are a couple very deep waterbars that might surprise you.

Northair Mine Driving Map Directions v7

Also, the trailhead to the Sproatt Alpine Trail is almost 4 kilometres past the turnoff to Northair Mine and the old FSR road quickly becomes narrow, steep and plenty of boulder sections.  There are several good places along the way to pull out, park, or turn around and surprisingly, there are only a few mild washouts.  A good idea if you are not keen on difficult 4x4 roads is to either park at Northair Mine and walk, or drive the first kilometre and park at one of the clearings along the route.  The worst part of the road between Northair Mine and the trailhead is about 1.6k to 2.2k where it becomes quite narrow, steep and the boulders and ruts are big and deep.  Past this section the road becomes surprisingly good for the remaining 2k until nearer the trailhead.  Keep in mind that there are no trailhead signs except a large mapboard sign for the Sproatt Valley.  It is huge and hard to miss, despite falling over and sliding into a gully.

Mount Sproatt Northair Trailhead Map

Northair Mine is a surreal little world of colourful murals on abandoned cement foundations, surrounded by an astoundingly tranquil little lake in a secluded forest.  Just a short logging road off of the Callaghan Valley Road takes you to this unusual little abandoned mine.  You would have driven by the turnoff if you have been to Whistler Olympic Park or Alexander Falls, both of which are just a couple kilometres away.  Northair Mine gets its name from the Vancouver based mining company the Northair Group.  The mine was in production from 1976 and extracted 5 tons of gold before being abandoned in 1982. Today it is a bizarre little world in the mountains that has become an incredible place to escape the world and camp out under the stars.  Northair Mine is tricky to find and even when you near it, the turnoff is not obvious.  The access road takes you high into the mountains and is only free of snow in May most years.  In 2016, for example, the snow melted enough for vehicle access during the first week in May.  Driving to Northair Mine is along a bumpy, potholed, old logging road drivable by most vehicles, though at least one deep washout may give even SUV's some difficulty.  Once Northair Mine comes into view it is quite a sight.  The area that surrounds the old ruins is unexpectedly huge.  About 2 kilometres long, edged by a cliff on one side and a beautiful lake on the other.

Northair Mine in the Callaghan Valley

Northair Mine Old Building Foundations

 More Hiking Around Sproatt

There are several hiking trails and sights to see around the Sproatt Alpine Trail.  The Rainbow Trail to Rainbow Falls and Rainbow Lake can be found further along the Flank Trail near Rainbow Park in Whistler.  The Madeley Lake trail runs over the top of the Sproatt Alpine Trail and connects Madeley Lake to Hanging Lake and then to Rainbow Lake.  Hanging Lake can be reached by and unmarked, though fairly easy alpine route off of the Sproatt Alpine Trail.  Northair Mine near the Callaghan Valley end of the trail is a surreal little world in the mountains.  There are cement foundations adorned with graffiti, two lakes and all sorts of curiosities to explore.  Northair Mine is a great place to camp if you can manage to get your vehicle past the washouts on the bad forest service road to it.  Alexander Falls, one of Whistler's most amazing waterfalls to see is easy to drive to, without a 4x4.  The Callaghan Valley has several other great places to hike. Callaghan Lake Provincial Park has some short trails at this beautiful lake as well as free campsites.  Cirque Lake is a challenging, though short trail that begins at the far end of Callaghan Lake.  The Ring Lake & Conflict Lake trail also starts from near Callaghan Lake Provincial Park.

Alexander Falls - Sights Near Sproatt

Alexander Falls is a very impressive 43 metre/141 foot waterfall just 30 to 40 minutes south of Whistler in the Callaghan Valley. Open year-round and located just before Whistler Olympic Park where several of the 2010 Olympic events were held. There is a nice viewing platform on the edge of the cliff across from the falls which crash fantastically into the valley below.  The parking area and viewing platform at Alexander Falls is one big area just 40 metres from the main road, just before Whistler Olympic Park.  The adventurous can find the obscure trail that leads to both the top of the falls as well as, with great difficulty, to the base of the falls.  Alexander Falls is certainly one of the nicest spots for a picnic in Whistler.  The picnic areas are numerous, the surrounding forest is gorgeous and wild and Alexander Falls crashes loud and beautiful in the background.  Continued here...

Alexander Falls Best Whistler Hiking

Alexander Falls Map v9

Madeley Lake - Hikes Near Sproatt

Madeley Lake is a beautiful, remote mountain lake hidden high up in the Callaghan Valley.  From Whistler Village expect to take 40 minutes to drive there.  You can drive directly to the lake, however the access road is pretty bad with deep waterbars.  An average 4x4 can make it quite easily, though most cars with have great difficulty driving over the numerous deep water cut gouges in the road.  Located near Alexander Falls, Madeley Lake is close to several beautiful places.  This is an amazing place to camp.  If looking for solitude at a paradise, mountain lake, Madeley Lake is hard to beat. Though somewhat popular with fishing, you are still likely to rarely see anyone at the lake in the summer and never in the fall.  Once in a while you will see a car or two at the trailhead to Hanging Lake.  If you have a canoe, Madeley Lake is a great place to paddle around or just float in the sun.  Continued here...

Madeley Lake Tent View

Madeley Lake Large Map v6

Rainbow Lake - Hikes Near Sproatt

The Rainbow Trail is a convenient and popular trail near Whistler Village that takes you to Rainbow Lake as well as the Rainbow-Sproatt Flank Trail, Rainbow Falls, Hanging Lake, Madeley Lake, Beverley Lake, Rainbow Mountain... and even Whistler Olympic Park if you are determined.  It is a consistently uphill and very beautiful trail with several water (bridge) crossings and waterfalls on the way to the picture-perfect lake.  There are a few views of the valley across to Whistler Mountain, Blackcomb Mountain, and Wedge Mountain.  Few views, though fantastic.  Rainbow Lake itself is in a gorgeous alpine valley with branching trails that extend further beyond the lake in at least three directions.  Along with the waterfalls, bridge crossings and valley views, the Rainbow Trail passes through deep forest with some impressively huge trees.  Continued here...

Rainbow Lake Hike in Whistler

Rainbow Lake Map v11

Two Fantastic Books About BC Hiking!

Scrambles in SW BCA Passion for MountainsHere are two excellent books on hiking and geology of British Columbia.  Matt Gunn's Scrambles in Southwest British Columbia includes the various routes to the summit of Wedge Mountain as well as summit routes to the neighbouring peaks, Weart, Cook, Parkhurst and Rethel.  Mount Weart is the second highest mountain in Garibaldi Park and is located just north of Wedge Mountain, separated by the Wedge-Weart Col.  Published in 2005, Scrambles in Southwest British Columbia is still the best guide in print or online.  A Passion for Mountains by Kathryn Bridge is a fascinating look at Don and Phyllis Munday's prolific exploration of the mountains in BC.  Based out of Vancouver, they were dominant figures of the climbing community in the early 1900's.  In 1923 they visited their friend Neal Carter in Alta Lake(Whistler) and explored the mountains around the valley.. many for the first time!

**We participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and earn a small commission on purchases we link through to Amazon at no extra cost to you.  We only link to books and products we love and highly recommend.  Thanks for your support!**

Hiking in Whistler in October is often unexpectedly stunning.  The days are much shorter and colder but the mountains are alive with colour from the fall ...
Read more
November in Whistler is when the temperatures plummet and the first heavy snow falls in the alpine and often in Whistler Village.  The hiking opportunities become ...
Read more
December hiking in Whistler is mainly done on snowshoes, though if it hasn't snowed for a few days, trails to Whistler Train Wreck and Rainbow Falls can ...
Read more
There are plenty of beautiful and free snowshoe trails in Whistler and Garibaldi Provincial Park.  From the surreal paintings of Whistler Train Wreck to ...
Read more

The second Caterpillar tractor in Parkhurst Ghost Town is considerably harder to find despite being just a few metres from the hulking Caterpillar at the shore ...
Read more
Waterbar and Cross-Ditch: the purpose of a waterbar or cross-ditch is to capture and redirect surface water from the road and channel it across the road ...
Read more
Whistler spruce is a hybrid of the Sitka spruce and the interior Engelmann spruce. Sitka spruce trees thrive in the rainforests of the Pacific Northwest ...
Read more
Coast Douglas-fir trees are medium to extremely large trees that you will encounter in Whistler and Garibaldi Park. They are the second tallest conifer ...
Read more
Aiguille: a tall, narrow, characteristically distinct spire of rock. From the French word for "needle". Used extensively as part of the names for many ...
Read more
Green Lake is the marvellously vivid, green coloured lake just north of Whistler Village.  Driving north on the Sea to Sky Highway, Green Lake appears ...
Read more
The Table is an extraordinary flat-topped mountain located in Garibaldi Park just one kilometre south of Garibaldi Lake.  Sometimes reflexively referred to as ...
Read more
The pale green shub-like growths hanging from trees in the forests around Whistler is called usnea.  These bushy, coral-like fruticose lichens anchor to bark ...
Read more

Rent Hiking Gear Whistler & Garibaldi Park

Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking

Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerAlexander Falls  Moderate Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyAncient Cedars  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerBlack Tusk  Pay Use Hiking Trail WhistlerBlackcomb Mountain  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerBrandywine Falls  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyBrandywine Meadows  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyBrew Lake  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerCallaghan Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerCheakamus Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyCheakamus River  Whistler Hiking Trail HardCirque Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyFlank Trail  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerGaribaldi Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerGaribaldi Park  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerHelm Creek  Moderate Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyJane Lakes  Joffre Lakes Hike in Whistler in SeptemberJoffre Lakes  Moderate Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyKeyhole Hot Springs  Hiking Trail Hard Dog FriendlyLogger’s Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyMadeley Lake  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyMeager Hot Springs Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerNairn Falls  Whistler Hiking Trail HardNewt Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerPanorama Ridge  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyParkhurst Ghost Town  Hiking Trail Hard Dog FriendlyRainbow Falls  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerRainbow Lake  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyRing Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerRusset Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasySea to Sky Trail  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerSkookumchuck Hot Springs  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerSloquet Hot Springs  Sproatt East  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerSproatt West  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerTaylor Meadows  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyTrain Wreck  Hiking Trail Hard - Whistler TrailsWedgemount Lake  Pay Use Hiking Trail WhistlerWhistler Mountain

  Winter Hiking WhistlerJanuary  Winter Hiking WhistlerFebruary  Spring Hiking WhistlerMarch  Spring Hiking WhistlerApril  Spring Hiking WhistlerMay  Summer Hiking WhistlerJune  Summer Hiking WhistlerJuly  Summer Hiking WhistlerAugust  Fall Hiking WhistlerSeptember  Fall Hiking WhistlerOctober  Fall Hiking WhistlerNovember  Winter Hiking WhistlerDecember

Nairn Falls is a wonderful, crashing and chaotic waterfall that surrounds you from the deluxe viewing platform that allows you to safely watch it from above.  The beautiful, green water rushes through the ...
Read more
Keyhole Hot Springs (aka Pebble Creek Hot Springs) is located 100 kilometres from Whistler (Village Gate Blvd). Closed from Apr 1- Nov 15 due to Grizzly Bears habituated to humans in the area. Though most of the ...
Read more
Callaghan Lake Provincial Park is a relatively untouched wilderness of rugged mountainous terrain. The valley walls were formed by relatively recent glaciation. Evidence of this can be seen in the ...
Read more
Ancient Cedars is a nice, easy/moderate 2.5 kilometre (1.6 mile) hiking trail on the far side of Cougar Mountain, just 13.1 kilometres north of Whistler Village. A small, untouched grove of huge western ...
Read more